Teens accused of blasphemy for dancing to Maroon 5 during prayer in Indonesia (PHOTOS, VIDEO)

The five girls recorded themselves praying and dancing. Some in Indonesia are calling it blasphemy.

TOLI-TOLI PERANTAU VIA YOUTUBE

The five girls recorded themselves praying and dancing. Some in Indonesia are calling it blasphemy.

Five Indonesian teens are in big trouble for showing off their “moves like Jagger.”

The girls have been accused of blasphemy and may be forced into juvenile detention after they filmed themselves dancing to another Maroon 5 song during a prayer session.

The twelfth graders appeared in a five-minute cell phone video where they alternated between performing Sholat, or prayer, and dancing like teenagers to Maroon 5’s single “One More Night.” The girls were allegedly looking for a Bangkok Post reports.

There’s plenty of head bobbing, hair flipping, and a little bit of gyrating. The girls were allegedly inspired by the popular Harlem Shake YouTube videos.

The video was initially shared through cell phones. It was eventually uploaded to YouTube, where it has been viewed more than 500,000 times, AFP reports.

The five-minute dance party may have lasting effects on the girls' careers. They were prohibited from taking an important national test.

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The five-minute dance party may have lasting effects on the girls’ careers. They were prohibited from taking an important national test.

But the performance didn’t sit well with the headmaster of the State Senior High School 2 in Tolitoli. He took the video to the nation’s top clerical body, the Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI), and to the fundamentalist Islamic Defenders Front (FPI).

“The school and members of the community were offended by the video and felt it insulted Islam,” Tolitoli police chief Rudi Mulyanto told AFP.

Dozens of FPI members protested outside a local police station on Monday, demanding punishment for the girls.

The girls were expelled from school and forbidden from taking an important national exam that determines their eligibility to graduate from high school.

The girls’ headmaster reported the video to the police.

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The girls’ headmaster reported the video to the police.

The headmaster then reported the incident to police, telling the Jakarta Post that he felt forced to do so to prevent public outcry.

“The public, especially the Muslim community, was angry; they could not accept the act,” he said.

The teens face time in juvenile detention for “tainting religion,” according to the Jakarta Globe.

Since they are between the ages of 17 and 18, the girls are being treated as minors. They are not currently in custody.

Violators of Indonesia’s strict blasphemy laws can face a maximum of five years in jail, although minors are not treated as harshly.

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Violators of Indonesia’s strict blasphemy laws can face a maximum of five years in jail, although minors are not treated as harshly.

Blasphemous acts against any of the five officially recognized religions in Indonesia carry a maximum jail time of five years. Minors usually face half the adult sentence and are placed in juvenile detention, Al Arabiya reports.

Children’s rights activists in Indonesia have condemned the school for overreacting to the video.

Seto Mulyadi, of Indonesia’s National Commission on Child Protection, said that prohibiting the teens from taking the national exam was a violation of their rights, since it could have a lasting effect on their future careers.

“In this case, these children have not been convicted, so why was their right to education violated?” Mulyadi told the Jakarta Globe.

Read more: NY Daily News

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